Voice and Dialects

17 Secrets of Audiobook Narrators

BY MICHELE DEBCZAK via www.mentalflloss.com Once associated with dusty library cassette tapes, audiobooks are more popular than ever. New technology has made it easy to listen to large audio files on the go, and the resulting surge in listeners has helped the format slough off some of the stigma of decades past. Contrary to the old idea that audiobooks are “cheating,” scientists say that listening to your literature stimulates the brain just as much as reading it does. The recent boom in audiobooks means that the voiceover artists who bring them to life are especially busy. Mental Floss spoke with a few industry professionals to learn about what it takes to excel at the job—including their diligent voice-care regimens, the one thing they always look for during research, and the spoilers th...

Voice Over Auditions by the Numbers

By KATE McCLANAGHAN via www.backstage.com How many auditions do you imagine it takes to land a single voiceover job? Five? Ten? Twenty? There must be an average. There is, but it’s likely to be a great deal more than you might think. You build your professional reputation as a voice talent and as an actor by consistently delivering exceptional auditions. Lots and lots and lots of them. Which is why tenacity is such a critical element to succeeding in this (or any business). So if it’s walking and chewing gum you’re after, best keep walking. There’s not much demand for that. You can’t underestimate that the bulk of your job as a professional talent is auditioning. You could even consider auditions your greatest form of promotion—they just shouldn’t be your only form of promotion (as it appe...

The “Forward Placement” Chart

MATTHEW EDWARDS explores the use of voice placement charts, like the one  pictured from Lilli Leghmann’s  book “How to Sing“, as a way for voice teachers to communicate with their students.  He goes on to say in his article,  “while some students may find placement charts such as the one above useful, many others will not. If you are getting good results with all of your students using placement terminology – great. However, if a student fails to respond, it is likely because their perceptions of resonance are different than yours or the creator of the charts they are using. For those students, focusing on vocal function will yield much better results than continuing to force the voice into a place it does not want to go. If you feel like your description of placeme...