Visual Arts

What to Know About Being on Set for the First Time

BY CASEY MINK via www.backstage.com As an actor trying to break into the film or television world, you spend endless days and nights dreaming of the moment you can finally step onto a set. But what happens when you actually get there? Do you know how to conduct yourself professionally on camera and off? Do you know the faux pas to avoid so you don’t give away your status as a newbie? Do you know when to pipe up and, conversely, when to zip it? Do you know how the actor’s role relates to the director and producer? It’s OK if you weren’t able to answer “yes” to every one of these questions—even Meryl Streep once walked onto a set for the first time. (Though she was probably brilliant on that day, too.) We’re all allowed to start somewhere, and Backstage wants to make sure you are starting wi...

How to Become a Showrunner

BY CORI HUNDT via www.backstage.com We are indeed in a golden age of television. Just think of all the TV series that have been recommended but are still on your to-watch list because there just is not enough time in the day to get through them all. It’s almost impossible to see everything you’ve been told is amazing! But what if you don’t just love watching wonderful TV series? What if you want to run your own one day? If you love screenwriting and the idea of producing and overseeing the day-to-day operations of a television show, you might just have a future as a showrunner. What is a showrunner? What does a showrunner do? As you might gather from the name, a showrunner quite literally “runs the show” to make sure all of the writing and producing on a TV series is punctual, on budget, a...

Miriam Shor: From Acting On-Stage…To Directing On-Screen

BY RUTHIE FIERBERG via www.playbill.com The actor and director reveals the step-by-step process of directing the July 10 episode of the hit series starring Sutton Foster. Miriam Shor has a habit of stealing scenes. She’s not trying to, but her magnetism, her nuance, her timing in the small moments, and her delivery in the big ones make it so you can’t look away, whether that’s as Yitzhak in the original Hedwig and the Angry Inch, Madelaine True in The Wild Party, Jessie in Off-Broadway’s Sweat, guest-starring on television’s The Americans, or her gig as series regular Diana Trout on TVLand’s Younger. But now, she directs her first episode of television: Episode 5 of Younger’s current season. Miriam Shor Courtesy of TVLand “I always was one of those annoying people hanging out at video vill...

SNL Hair and Makeup Heads Reveal How They Create Their Weekly Transformations

BY CASEY MINK via www.backstage.com If you’ve ever marveled at a “Saturday Night Live” cast member’s transformation from parrot to politician in one commercial break, you should know the names Jodi Mancuso and Louie Zakarian, the sketch show’s longtime hair and makeup department heads. Just ahead of the television institution’s 43rd season finale, Mancuso and Zakarian—who have 12 Emmys between them—spoke with Backstage to break down what a show week typically looks like, how their work helps actors find and get into their many characters, and the one look creator Lorne Michaels deemed too shocking. How do you typically prepare for a show week? Louie Zakarian (makeup): It starts on Tuesdays, when the host comes in and we do promos. We do the table read on Wednesday; we go through something ...

How to Become a TV Director

BY BENJAMIN LINDSAY via www.backstage.com Making it onto the small screen as an actor is one thing, but doing it as a director is another thing entirely. With this Backstage Guide, we give you the tips and tricks you need to build the experience, reel, and relationships that will one day lead to you sitting in the director’s chair while helming television’s next big thing.  What is the responsibility of the director? At the end of the day, a director’s responsibility is to organize, facilitate, and capture the desired footage that will ultimately make up a film or television program. While their day-to-day responsibilities may differ based on the medium in which they’re working, they are always one of the top above-the-liners and authority figures on set, and more often than not, they have...

Register for the 2018 Rocky Mountain Theatre Convention!

REGISTER NOW Registration for the 2018 Rocky Mountain NATO Theatre Convention is open! VENDORS (Product Reps & Companions) : Click here to register! EXHIBITORS (Theatre Owners & Employees) : Click here to register! FILM STUDIOS : Click here to register! Hotel Information Book by September 24, 2018 for convention rates! Book Here About Rock Mountain NATO Rocky Mountain NATO is a non-profit trade association that encompasses the six state area of Montana, Idaho, Colorado, Utah, New Mexico and Wyoming. The association is comprised of motion picture exhibitors, theatre owners and operators with facilities located in the six states. Our membership includes large chains, regional circuits and independent theatre owners and membership is open to all exhibitors. Size does not matter and th...

11 Great Film Markets Outside of NYC and L.A.

BY KC WRIGHT via www.backstage.com It’s no secret that rising costs, tax incentives, and the growth of new media have been moving film and television productions out of Hollywood and New York. As the work expands to other regions across the continent, so do opportunities for actors in these small (but powerful) markets. Not feeling the “big pond” of New York or Los Angeles? Here are 11 other cities where you can make your on-camera dreams come true. Albuquerque With 64 major film, television, and commercial projects produced in fiscal year 2014, according to the New Mexico Film Office, New Mexico is an excellent market for on-camera talent. Albuquerque-based actors receive tons of local support from the NM Film Office and other organizations, and schools like the ABQ Actors Studio train th...

Sound designers celebrate the return of their Tony Awards categories

BY CAITLIN HUSTON via www.broadway.news The Tony Award categories for sound design are back with a boom. Eleven sound designers of plays and musicals were nominated for Tony Awards this season, five years after the categories had been eliminated from consideration. With the return of the category comes a new voting system and a reinvigorated community supporting the designers and their work. “It’s an honor to be nominated in a category that has come back from the dead,” said Kai Harada, sound designer on “The Band’s Visit.” The Tony Awards for sound design was first awarded in 2008 and then taken away in 2014 without explanation by the Tony Awards Administration Committee. A New York Times article from that time cited two Tony voters who said voters largely did not know how to evaluate sou...

Designing for Live TV & Events Webinar – Register Today!

Attend this webinar to gain insight on lighting design for TV production and explore the challenges faced by the next generation of Lighting Directors. Date & Time: Wednesday, March 28, 2018  at 10:00 am Eastern Daylight Time Panelist: Roger Williams Duration: 1 Hour CLICK HERE TO REGISTER In this webinar Roger will discuss TV lighting application, how he got into the business, and the challenges faced by the next generation of Lighting Directors in TV production. Roger will also explore the specific challenges of lighting for TV and the skills required to balance what’s captured on camera for the viewing audience vs lighting the live event, whilst also working for the viewing TV audience.  His lighting credits include: The Jump – Channel 4 XFactor auditions – ITV1 Question...

Jon Kusner: Evolving Light

via https://www.chauvetprofessional.com Every lighting project is a puzzle, for this Park City, Utah based designer, a collection of disparate parts that must be woven together into a balanced, harmonious look through the art of design. Since leaving the Tisch School for the Arts at NYU to work for Broadway legend Ken Billington in the 1990s, Kusner has become a master at solving design riddles, first in the world of theatre, and later in broadcast applications. This ability has earned him the universal admiration of his peers, along with two Prime Time Emmy Awards and 11 nominations. Having worked on major broadcast events like the Academy Award and Grammy Award shows, as well as The Opening Ceremonies of the Salt Lake Olympics, The MTV Video Awards and Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show, Kus...

Mandy Moore On How She Juggles Being One of the Busiest Choreographers in Hollywood

BY RACHEL ZAR via www.dancemagazine.com In the dance world, Mandy Moore has long been a go-to name, but in 2017, the success of her choreography for La La Land made the rest of the world stop and take notice. After whirlwind seasons as choreographer and producer on both “Dancing with the Stars” and “So You Think You Can Dance,” she capped off the year with two Emmy Award nominations—and her first win. You’ve come a long way on “So You Think You Can Dance”—from assistant to the choreographer (Season 1) to creative producer (Season 14). What keeps you returning to the show? “So You Think You Can Dance” was one of my first jobs, so it feels like home. I love the chaos of live television; as soon as one show is over you’re on to the n...

Set Designer Shares Secrets to Creating the World of “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”

BY ARLYN HERNANDEZ via www.apartmenttherapy.com Set in a 1950s-era Manhattan, the candy colored world dictated by Sherman-Palladino for “Maisel” is beautiful, layered and truly a feast for the eyes. One look at Midge’s Regency-meets-midcentury bedecked Upper West Side pre-war apartment was all it took to make my heart race in decor lust. Dorothy Draper Espana chests, Chinoiserie mural folding screens, a perfectly retro kitchen I’d take even in 2018… these are the stars of the series in my eyes. I reached out to Bill Groom, the production design artist behind the brush that painted this glorious landscape, to chat about the show’s captivating visuals. Apartment Therapy: You’ve created a technicolor world that seems to be a rich ’50s tapestry. Where ...

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