Production

Bring Original Broadway Choreography to Your Local Shows

BY: BWW News Desk via www.broadwayworld.com Music Theatre International (MTI) and Jerry Mitchell, choreographer for Kinky Boots, Legally Blonde, Hairspray, Catch Me If You Can and The Full Monty have partnered to revolutionize the way you choreograph your musicals with a new innovative resource: The Original Production (TOP). TOP has collaborated with Broadway’s best choreographers to create an easy-to-use online tool that enables you to learn original Broadway choreography from the actual creators and provides you with the rights to perform these iconic numbers in your musical production. This resource includes 3-4 hours of step-by-step video instruction, which you can then use as a guide to recreate numbers for your production. TOP is launching with two musical hits, Legally Blonde...

The “Forward Placement” Chart

MATTHEW EDWARDS explores the use of voice placement charts, like the one  pictured from Lilli Leghmann’s  book “How to Sing“, as a way for voice teachers to communicate with their students.  He goes on to say in his article,  “while some students may find placement charts such as the one above useful, many others will not. If you are getting good results with all of your students using placement terminology – great. However, if a student fails to respond, it is likely because their perceptions of resonance are different than yours or the creator of the charts they are using. For those students, focusing on vocal function will yield much better results than continuing to force the voice into a place it does not want to go. If you feel like your description of placeme...

Can you imagine going to jail for singing a song?

That’s exactly what happened to Maria Alyokhina, a member of the Russian feminist punk-rock group Pussy Riot. She spent almost two years in prison for criticizing her government through performing, and now she’s sharing her story live on stage in Belarus Free Theatre’s Burning Doors, a visceral new show about state-sponsored brutality. At a time when words like dystopia, oppression, and totalitarianism are casually bandied about, it’s an eye-opening play about using art to resist, and one of three politically charged works we profiled in TDF Stages this week.

Get Up Close With the Props of Dear Evan Hansen

BY HANNAH VINE POSTED ON: PLAYBILL.COM A lot goes into putting on a Broadway show, from the performances and sound engineering to stage management and lighting. There’s so much happening onstage, that often, theatregoers miss the smaller details—like the props. We went backstage at the Music Box Theatre for an up-close look at the props used in the Tony-winning Dear Evan Hansen, and spoke to props supervisor for the the show Buist Bickley. Bickley gave us a run-down on how the props were selected and what steps are taken to maintain them over a long run. Whether it’s collaborating with the scenic or set designers to create a cohesive look, or making sure the materials are all flame retardant, every last detail is specifically curated for aesthetic and practical purposes. “Dear Evan H...

The Empty Space: A Book About the Theatre: Deadly, Holy, Rough, Immediate

From director and cofounder of the Royal Shakespeare Company Peter Brook, The Empty Space is a timeless analysis of theatre from the most influential stage director of the twentieth century. 

A Look into the Role of an Intimacy Director

What is an Intimacy Director? Writer Eli Keel of Leo Weekly explores the subject of onstage intimacy, the specific role of an intimacy director, and the process of their work.  Keel spoke in his article to  Alicia Rodis, a member of Intimacy Directors International about the “four pillars” of intimacy direction: Consent: Get the performers’ permission. Communication: Talk throughout the process aboutwhat is/isn’t working. Choreography: Don’t add anything extra. Context: Don’t change something in another scene without communicating about adjusting the choreography and seeking consent to do so. You can read the entire article here: How a kiss is not a kiss, and punches are pulled in acting What are your thoughts about intimacy direction? Should more theatres integrate this ...

Everything Sondheim

  • 1
  • 7
  • 8