Design

Vintage Photos of Life before AutoCAD

via www.vinate.es Before the advent of AutoCAD and other drafting softwares, the engineering drawings were made on sheet of papers using drawing boards. Many equipments were required to complete a given drawing such as drawing board, different grade pencils, Erasers T-squares, Set square etc. Almost 20 years ago, engineers and toolmakers used to draw all things on paper with the help of drafting tools and pencils. Drafting was indeed was tedious and time-consuming. Designing and putting everything on paper was a tough job, maybe that’s why the need of creation of AutoCAD software came up. The major disadvantage of paper based design was that, you can not actually change it after it’s been put on paper. So if design is changed, then start making sketches over! AutoCAD and all that softwares...

Register for the 4th Annual Vectorworks Design Summit

4th Annual Vectorworks Design Summit November 4-6, 2018 Phoenix, AZ We’re cranking up the heat at the fourth annual Vectorworks Design Summit. Join us in sunny Arizona at the Sheraton Grand at Wild Horse Pass for an exciting three days of indispensable workshops, inspired design, and improved connections. Located in the breathtaking Sonoran Desert, the Sheraton Grand celebrates the Gila River Indian heritage and culture. Extend your stay and enjoy everything the resort has to offer, including an 18-hole golf course, horseback riding, a world-class spa, and more! Registration You can pay one low price for two full days of in-depth training with Vectorworks software. No matter your industry or level of experience, you can’t afford to miss this valuable opportunity. REGULAR CONFERENCE – $599 ...

Register for the LiNK Grad School Auditions & Interviews! (Hosted by USITT & SETC)

Where Master’s Candidates and Recruiters Connect SETC and USITT partner each fall to bring graduate theatre degree programs together with people considering options for interviews, auditions, and information exchange. Connect with more than 50 programs across theatre disciplines including Acting, Design, Technology, and Management. Explore your options for advanced education and find your dream grad program in one convenient, affordable location. 5th Annual LiNK When: Nov. 9-11, 2018 Where:  Crowne Plaza Hotel Atlanta-Airport  |  Atlanta, GA For Candidates Register early with your resume, portfolio, and head shot for advance review by recruiters. $50 Early Registration: Aug. 1 – Sept. 12, 2018 $75 Late Registration: Sept. 13 – Oct. 24, 2018 $95 Onsite Registration: Onsite...

Serenbe Playhouse Sinks the Titanic, Nightly

via www.stage-directions.com This summer, the Serenbe Playhouse is producing Titanic: The Musical in which the ship is submerged nightly. Here’s a video documentary on the design and installation process as well as the actors and stunt coordinator working on this ambitious production that features Serenbe’s Artistic Director and Director of Titanic, Brian Clowdus along with Set Designer, Adam Koch, and Associate Designer, Steven Royal: Here’s a highlight video of Titanic that takes place at The Inn Lake at Serenbe, about 40 minutes outside Atlanta: Further information from Serenbe Playhouse: www.serenbeplayhouse.com View Original Article  

Props Fabricator: Fur, Foam & Focus

BY: MICHAEL EDDY via www.stage-directions.com In The Shop with Props Fabricator Zoë Morsette Zoë Morsette knew at an early age that she wanted to work in the theater. Inspired by a childhood filled with art and summer theater on Cape Cod where she grew up, Morsette completed her BA in theater and dance at Skidmore College in 1973 and then moved to NYC. She worked as a milliner at Radio City Music Hall for two years and then as a shop supervisor and fabricator in the display industry for five years. Freelance since 1984, Morsette has built props, models, costumes, and puppets for 51 Broadway productions, dozens of commercials and print ads, feature films, television shows, theme parks, ice shows, ballets, operas, and the Macy’s Parade. Morsette spoke with Stage Directions to discuss her wor...

They Speak Lighting

BY STUART MILLER via www.americantheatre.org The cast of The Iceman Cometh stands in a circle onstage at the Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre, hands clasped, lines from the play ricocheting from one actor to another. It’s a starry group—David Morse, Bill Irwin, Colm Meaney, and, of course, Denzel Washington—yet during this rehearsal they are left in semi-darkness. The only person fully illuminated is an 80-year-old man, standing alone, unmoving, at the top of the staircase stage right. That man, Jules Fisher, is not part of the cast, yet he is an essential part of the show; he has been lighting up stages in New York City (and beyond) for more than 50 years. Fisher, along with his working partner Peggy Eisenhauer, 55, are among the preeminent lighting designers in the American theatre, while also ...

SNL Hair and Makeup Heads Reveal How They Create Their Weekly Transformations

BY CASEY MINK via www.backstage.com If you’ve ever marveled at a “Saturday Night Live” cast member’s transformation from parrot to politician in one commercial break, you should know the names Jodi Mancuso and Louie Zakarian, the sketch show’s longtime hair and makeup department heads. Just ahead of the television institution’s 43rd season finale, Mancuso and Zakarian—who have 12 Emmys between them—spoke with Backstage to break down what a show week typically looks like, how their work helps actors find and get into their many characters, and the one look creator Lorne Michaels deemed too shocking. How do you typically prepare for a show week? Louie Zakarian (makeup): It starts on Tuesdays, when the host comes in and we do promos. We do the table read on Wednesday; we go through something ...

The Challenges of Designing Costumes for HDTV

via thecostumerag.com You only need to take a look in your local department store to see the immense size and quality of modern television screens aimed at the common family. Ultra-high-definition has given every broadcast a strangely smooth quality full of contrast and impeccable detail. Unfortunately one of the production departments with the biggest tasks with rising to this new standard of television is the costume department who, if our poll on the state of the costume industry is anything to go by, probably can’t afford to see their work in 4K glory. Besides more intense scrutiny for details, the new technology requires intense lighting that can easily bleach out much of the costume work. Colours have to be bold, which also meansweathering and ageing effects have to be exaggerated. I...

2018 Tony Award Winners

BY ADAM HETRICK via www.playbill.com The intimate chamber musical The Band’s Visit, which transferred to Broadway last fall following a sold-out world-premiere run at the Atlantic Theater Company Off-Broadway, was the biggest winner at the 72nd Annual Tony Awards, which were presented June 10 at Radio City Music Hall. Tony Shalhoub and Katrina Lenk Matthew Murphy Tony voters responded to composer David Yazbek and playwright Itamar Moses’ adaptation of the 2007 film by Eran Kolirin about an Egyptian police band stranded in a remote village in the Israeli desert, awarding it ten Tony Awards in total, including Best Musical. The Band’s Visit earned Tony Awards for Best Original Score, Best Book, Best Direction (David Cromer), Best Orchestrations (Jamshied Sharifi), Best Sound Design (Kai Hara...

How ‘Mean Girls’ and More are Leaning into Video Design

BY CAITLIN HUSTON via www.broadway.news In “Mean Girls,” a large white wall can instantly transform from an African savanna to the hallway of a suburban American high school and then to a visualization of the world of social media. These scene changes come thanks to Finn Ross and Adam Young, who created the LED videos featured on the musical’s set, which is nominated for a Tony Award. Beyond “Mean Girls,” video and projection design is appearing more frequently on the stage, both to keep up with modern playwrights and with new technology. “I think there is an evolution happening,” Ross said. “Gradually more and more and more it’s accepted and understood.” Working alongside set designer Scott Pask, Ross and Young used 650 LED tiles — with each functioning as its own kind of television that ...

Ding. Hiss. Chirp. Broadway’s Best Sounds (Other Than the Songs).

BY MICHAEL PAULSON via www.nytimes.com What kind of noise does a wand make? How about an angel? In 2014, Tony Awards administrators eliminated sound design as a contest category, arguing that too few voters understood the craft well enough to judge it. But an outcry ensued, and this year, the category is back, with a twist — only about half of the 841 voters, those deemed expert enough, will be allowed to vote. We asked the nominees who worked on plays, creating soundscapes for worlds first dreamed up by George Orwell and J.K. Rowling, among others, to share short audio samples and talk about their work. Have a listen. Adam Cork, ‘Travesties’ The challenge: To capture the spirit of Tom Stoppard’s zany and chaotic play, told in a series of repeating and often conflicting flashbacks that fea...

Sound designers celebrate the return of their Tony Awards categories

BY CAITLIN HUSTON via www.broadway.news The Tony Award categories for sound design are back with a boom. Eleven sound designers of plays and musicals were nominated for Tony Awards this season, five years after the categories had been eliminated from consideration. With the return of the category comes a new voting system and a reinvigorated community supporting the designers and their work. “It’s an honor to be nominated in a category that has come back from the dead,” said Kai Harada, sound designer on “The Band’s Visit.” The Tony Awards for sound design was first awarded in 2008 and then taken away in 2014 without explanation by the Tony Awards Administration Committee. A New York Times article from that time cited two Tony voters who said voters largely did not know how to evaluate sou...

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