Directors

Claire Warden: The First Broadway Credited Intimacy Director

In light of the #MeToo movement and safety in the workplace, intimacy direction has come in to the spotlight for production teams throughout the theatre, television, and film industry. Broadway intimacy director, Claire Warden, states in this article that intimacy direction “didn’t exist five years ago, in this form.” Now, what exactly does an intimacy director do? They choreograph scenes that involve any act of physical touch, scenes of nudity, simulated sex, and more. An intimacy director’s role in the rehearsal room or on set allows these sensitive moments to be worked on with precision, comfort, and consent. Through this, it lets these moments safely be done repeated on stage. In this article, Warden, Broadway’s first credited Intimacy Director, discusses her process and the importance...

ON TEACHING DIRECTING: THE ESSENTIAL FIVE

Fadi Fayad Skeiker shares five valuable tips when it comes to inspiring the next generation of directors. If your journey in theatre has led you to either education or directing, or even both, take a look at the advice Skeiker gives on the “Essential Five”. Make friends with a director Make students aware of the social impact of their art Help the student to find their voice Learning the rules/breaking the rules Directing is about details, details, THEN details READ ARTICLE via www.thetheatretimes.com

How Writer-Director Robert O’Hara Decides Which Plays to Direct and Which to Hand Over

BY MERVYN ROTHSTEIN via www.playbill.com It’s a unique voice, an exciting young voice, dealing with issues around race and identity and sexuality,” Obie-winning director and playwright Robert O’Hara says. “New ideas and new thoughts. I love plays that capture the imagination, that take you on a ride and an adventure. And I think this play does.” O’Hara is talking about Jeremy O. Harris’ Slave Play, which O’Hara directs at New York Theatre Workshop. The play, about black and white in white America, was called “willfully provocative, gaudily transgressive and altogether staggering,” as well as “furiously entertaining,” by The New York Times. Robert O’Hara and Jeremy O. Harris Marielle Solan O’Hara often directs his own plays, but recently directed works by Kirsten Childs and will direc...

Candidate registration for the 2019 URTAs is now open!

MFA training in theatre begins with URTA! At the URTAs, you can audition and interview with our 43 member universities all in one place, on a single day. Why navigate dozens of different applications, fees, appointments, and travel when you can get it all done at the URTAs? Choose your city—New York, Chicago, or San Francisco—and register to be seen by our recruiters in either acting, design, directing, stage management, or arts leadership. Our nationally ranked member schools boast professional faculty, a commitment to the highest standards in professional, graduate training, and are peer-reviewed on a continuing basis. Most also offer various forms of financial assistance. Graduates of URTA programs are working on Broadway, in top theatres across the country, in film, television, and bey...

Miriam Shor: From Acting On-Stage…To Directing On-Screen

BY RUTHIE FIERBERG via www.playbill.com The actor and director reveals the step-by-step process of directing the July 10 episode of the hit series starring Sutton Foster. Miriam Shor has a habit of stealing scenes. She’s not trying to, but her magnetism, her nuance, her timing in the small moments, and her delivery in the big ones make it so you can’t look away, whether that’s as Yitzhak in the original Hedwig and the Angry Inch, Madelaine True in The Wild Party, Jessie in Off-Broadway’s Sweat, guest-starring on television’s The Americans, or her gig as series regular Diana Trout on TVLand’s Younger. But now, she directs her first episode of television: Episode 5 of Younger’s current season. Miriam Shor Courtesy of TVLand “I always was one of those annoying people hanging out at video vill...

How to Become a TV Director

BY BENJAMIN LINDSAY via www.backstage.com Making it onto the small screen as an actor is one thing, but doing it as a director is another thing entirely. With this Backstage Guide, we give you the tips and tricks you need to build the experience, reel, and relationships that will one day lead to you sitting in the director’s chair while helming television’s next big thing.  What is the responsibility of the director? At the end of the day, a director’s responsibility is to organize, facilitate, and capture the desired footage that will ultimately make up a film or television program. While their day-to-day responsibilities may differ based on the medium in which they’re working, they are always one of the top above-the-liners and authority figures on set, and more often than not, they have...

Backstage With Tommy Tune

BY STEPHENIE LAWTON via www.dancemagazine.com Tommy Tune is a man of many talents. The 10-time Tony Award–winning director, choreographer and star is famous for shows like Nine, My One and Only, The Will Roger’s Follies and The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas. Tune is in a special class of gifted director/choreographers that includes George Balanchine, Jerome Robbins and Michael Bennett—yet he also danced and starred in his musicals. Today, he is touring the country with his nightclub act Tommy Tune Tonight. At 79, he is still lithe, graceful and willowy, and looks right at home onstage. So what’s it like to be backstage with the legend? Tune recently invited Dance Magazine behind the scenes for a rehearsal and performance in Los Angeles. Everyone Dresses Their Best For Tommy T...

Paving the Way: Five Directors Share Their Wisdom

BY FABIANA CABRAL via www.americantheatre.org Longtime director Susan H. Schulman recently told me a revealing anecdote about her parents. “They went to see the first show I directed Off-Broadway, all the way down in the Bowery,” Schulman recalled. “They were very excited to come, and they schlepped down to watch this little show. And at the intermission, my father said: ‘It’s wonderful, we love it, we love it! Now, tell me honey—what did you do?’” The paradox of the theatre director is that your work is evident everywhere, and also nowhere. In that sense, the field has not changed much. Theatre directing is still not for the faint of heart: It involves a passion and aptitude for visual and textual storytelling. It requires knowledge of every element of a production, from acting to technic...