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This “Carmen” is smoking: Central City Opera breathes fire into an audience favorite

Central City Opera’s “Carmen” is everything you want it to be, and then some — sexy, sultry and just a little sleazy. Its famous heroine uses and abuses just as she is known to do, teasing men and tempting fate until it all catches up to her in one violent moment. As a production, it is pleasing and terrifically tight and ultra-traditional, just as its creators imagined it in 1875. Director Jose Maria Condemi has, for the most part, resisted messing with the formula as some like to do to keep familiar titles fresh for audiences who have seen them a dozen times or more. Instead, he has gone the opposite way, pushing his characters to feel and indulge in the nuances of composer Georges Bizet’s emphatic music. Everything, from the costumes to the sets to the singing, honors the opera’s lusty,...

Poetry in Motion: August Wilson, Sonia Sanchez Inspire Two New Musicals

BY DARA MCBRIDE In UniSon, a new musical by Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s resident ensemble Universes, a young apprentice is left with a box of poetry from an old mentor. That’s a bit how the show itself developed—except that the box of poetry at its genesis was filled with the words of playwright August Wilson. Back in 1995, Universes cofounder Steven Sapp unexpectedly heard Wilson read his poetry at a gathering in Pittsburgh. “When I actually heard this man, who I only knew as a playwright, reading poetry, I thought, ‘Wait a minute—he’s a real poet,’” Sapp recalled. In fact, Wilson had begun with poetry before taking on theatre. In the 1960s, he joined the Centre Avenue Poets Theater Workshop in Pittsburgh and went on to cofound Black Horizon Theater with poets from Centre Avenue. When W...

Institute of Outdoor Theater

                             Learn About the IOT’s New Relationship With SETC

Dissonance Dance Theatre 2017-2018 Season Auditions

  “One of the 11 small-but-mighty dance companies outside of LA and NYC” – Dance Spirit Magazine For invitation to private audition, please send headshot, bodyshot, resume and video reel to: Shawn Short, Director Dissonance Dance Theatre accepts video auditions. For finalization of position, dancers will be ask to attend a private audition class with other candidates on July 8th, 2017  and an in-person interview. We are looking for emerging dance artists, who are hungry, open, and talented. Is that you? Then we want you. Register: In-Person    Fee: $20  Dates: July 8th Registration/Warm-Up 2:30pm-3:30pm Audition 3:30pm-5:00pm Company dancers receive performance stipends and pointe shoe allotments. Apprenticeship are non-paid positions. Dissonance Dance Theatre ...

2 Ring Circus Has Gotten Its Act Together and Taken It on the Road

The members of 2 Ring Circus have gone a few threats beyond triple: They sing, act, dance, and play instruments, all while performing circus acts. And they’re lending their many talents to theatrical productions far afield from their home base in New York City. They’re currently in Arkansas working on a circus version of Godspell which runs June 2-25 at Arkansas Rep. The company’s artistic director, Joshua Dean, first fell in love with circus work by accident. Cast in a show in Chicago that required him to learn some tricks, he loved the training. Back in New York City, Dean focused on musical theatre, but his circus side kept nagging at him. “Eventually I kind of stopped doing musical theatre and went full-fledged into circus,” he recalls, coaxing his partner, Ben Franklin, to do the same...


Spanning 150 acres in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains, Dollywood offers more than 40 rides, 15 exceptional shows, five of the South’s largest festivals, Southern-style dining, and the friendliest employees in the world!

Read More Pascal Rioult debuts a new work set to the music he loved as a teen   For much of his choreographic career, Pascal Rioult gravitated toward major classical works: Mozart, Ravel, Bach, Stravinsky, even celebrated scores other choreographers had used. He welcomed the challenge of translating such iconic music into movement. But recently, he’s been drawn to a radically different genre: the progressive rock he danced to in clubs as a French teenager, long before he considered pursuing the art form professionally .

The Line in the Sand: How ‘Sneetches’ Spoke to a Divisive Moment

A girl of maybe 12 or 13 years old pushes through the doors into the theatre and stops in her tracks, looking at the world on stage: fuzzy purple grass, a raked stage covered in painted sand, a lifeguard chair with a ladder so curved it looks like it could topple at any moment. This is where the Star Belly Beachwatcher (Dean Holt) will sit, a Sneetch with the job of keeping the Star Bellies and the Plain Bellies separate. How does he do this? By watching the big, fat, stark red line right down the middle of Sneetch Beach. “Dad—lookit!” the girl effuses, her eyes gone wide. She’s ready to dive headfirst into the world of The Sneetches. Read More

Cooling Down: How Actors Unwind After Taxing Performances

Most actors methodically warm up for emotionally draining performances. But what do they do to recoup reality? BY JONATHAN MANDELL Every night I had to kill myself,” declares actor Daniel N. Durant with an exasperated shrug. Durant made his Broadway debut in the recent revival of Spring Awakening as Moritz, a young man who commits suicide in a climactic moment. It wasn’t easy. “Most of my day was spent getting into character, and then I had to go through those emotions every night,” Durant recounts. After the performance, most of his night was spent trying to reverse the process: “I played video games to get out of it. My favorite was Call of Duty, a high-energy game that I confess I’m addicted to.” Austin P. McKenzie, Durant’s castmate in the musical, portrayed Moritz’s close friend, Melc...

Broadway’s Amelie

Designers perpetually astound me. This week, I spoke to two of them: David Zinn, who dreamed up the magical set and costumes for Broadway’s Amelie, and Sandra Goldmark, whose set for Vanity Fair is a thrilling collision of metaphors. I love “reading” the design of a production, because understanding how sets, costumes, light, and sound impact a story can often be a key to unlocking everything.

Wayne Brady: Talk Less, Sing More

Read More   Wayne Brady, best known for his Emmy-winning TV work, is also at home onstage: He appeared on Broadway in Kinky Boots and is currently playing Aaron Burr in the Chicago cast of Hamilton through April 9. What’s your first theatrical memory? I think I was in first or second grade and was part of a school play or pageant. I saw James Brown on TV, and for my solo I decided to do a shimmy into one of the James Brown jazz splits. And I felt so cool onstage. That’s the feeling that I wanted to duplicate later in my life. My first time onstage doing a play was Dark of the Moon in high school my junior year. I walked onstage, got a bit of applause—I was playing a funny character named Uncle Smelicue Jed—and I thought, “Oh, this is what I want to do.”

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