Dance

The Relationship Between Ballet and Physics

BY HANNAH FOSTER via www.pointemagazine.com For Better Jumps and Higher Legs, Turn to Newton’s Third Law: Merritt Moore and Claudia Schreier Explain The Relationship Between Ballet and Physics Last Saturday night, I had a balletic epiphany. I wasn’t in a mirrored studio taking class or even in a theater watching a performance. This luminous ray of understanding beamed into—wait for it—the basement of a math museum. The National Museum of Mathematics (yes, that exists) hosted its fourth Quadrivium, a salon focusing on the intersections of music and math last Saturday in New York City. The evening’s special guests were none other than ballerina Merritt Moore and choreographer Claudia Schreier. After Schreier and Moore took their seats next to the event’s host, saxophonist M...

Can’t Pick Up Choreography Quickly? This Might Be Why

BY  HELENE SCHWARTZ via www.dancemagazine.com Lately I’ve been having recurring dreams: I’m in an audition and I can’t remember the combination. Or, I’m rehearsing for an upcoming show, onstage, and I don’t know what comes next. Each time I wake up relieved that it was only a dream. However, this is the reality of how I often felt throughout my dance career. Once I knew the steps, there was no undoing it. It was the process of getting there that haunts me to this day. Even as a young dancer I had trouble. At 9 or 10 years old, I couldn’t wait to make it into my dance studio’s junior company, and I prepared by watching VHS tapes of recitals from previous years on repeat. But I could never prepare enough to predict what would be shown in the audition...

Audition for Colorado Ballet Academy’s Summer Intensive & Pre-Professional Division

Are you looking for inspiration to develop and grow as an artist, preparing you for a career as a dancer? The Raydean Acevedo Colorado Ballet Academy’s (CBA) Summer Intensive and Pre-Professional Division receive rave reviews from students, teachers and directors. These programs offer aspiring dancers instruction and career guidance from internationally renowned master teachers and CBA’s accomplished faculty. Training takes place in Colorado Ballet’s eight state-of-the-art studios at The Armstrong Center for Dance. Under the leadership of Director Erica Fischbach and SI Directors Amanda McKerrow and John Gardner, students receive professional training in an environment that fosters growth, wellness and excellence in all aspects of dance—from classical ballet to the divers...

Fixing These 5 Bad Habits Can Take Your Dancing to the Next Level

BY GAVIN LARSEN via www.pointemagazine.com Striving for higher extensions, more turnout and bigger jumps may be at the top of your agenda in daily class. But what about those finer points of your technique, the subtleties that make a dancer really shine? They need just as much of your attention, and letting seemingly innocuous bad habits linger will impact your overall dancing. “There are no shortcuts in ballet,” says Cynthia Harvey, artistic director of the Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School at American Ballet Theatre. “You can’t expect good results by ignoring details that are the building blocks of technique.” We break down five bad habits that are easy to overlook—but have a major impact. Knuckling Peff Modelski, a faculty member at Visceral Dance Chicago w...

Meet The Movement Coach Who Helped Rami Malek Transform Into Freddie Mercury

BY JENNIFER STAHL via www.dancemagazine.com Watching Bohemian Rhapsody through the eyes of dancer, there’s a certain element of the movie that’s impossible to ignore: Rami Malek’s physical performance of Freddie Mercury. The way he so completely embodies the nuances of the rock star is simply mind-blowing. We had to learn how he did it, so we called up Polly Bennett, the movement director who coached him through the entire process. In a bit of serendipitous timing, while we were on the phone, she got a text from Malek that he had just been nominated for a Golden Globe. And during our chat, it became quite clear that she had obviously been a major part of that—more than we could have ever imagined. What Exactly Is a Movement Director? Although the profession seems to be mo...

From Professional Dancer to Professor of Dance

via www.dancemagazine.com In the final years of her decade-long career with the Lewitzky Dance Company, University of Arizona Associate Professor Amy Ernst began to develop an interest in dance injury prevention. She remembers feeling an urge to widen her understanding of dance and the body. Soon after retirement from the Company, she was hired by the Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic in Inglewood, California as a physical therapy assistant, where she worked for the next three and a half years. This work eventually led her to pursue an M.F.A. in dance at the University of Washington-Seattle. She remembers growing into the role of a professor during her time pursuing her degree. That incubation phase was critical. Ernst joined the faculty at the University of Arizona in 1995, and now as direct...

College Scholarship Programs & Fairs for Dancers

BY MADELINE SCHROCK via www.dancemagazine.com Dancing in college is undoubtedly expensive, but these two events allow you to audition for scholarships from multiple programs at once. Dancewave’s Dancing Through College & Beyond Photo by Linneah Anders, Courtesy Dancewave This fair’s College Scholarship auditions give high school seniors exposure to college reps from across the country. In 2017, 65 percent of the participants were offered merit scholarships totaling $3.4 million. This year’s expanded audition offerings, held at Hunter College in New York City, will accommodate up to 150 dancers. Participating schools include heavy hitters like Boston Conservatory at Berklee, New York University, The Juilliard School, University of Southern California and many more. Oct...

When rips, tears and falls kill a dancer’s career (or don’t)

BY SARAH L. KAUFMAN via www.washingtonpost.com Lauren Post, a corps de ballet member of American Ballet Theatre, caught her foot in the hem of her costume one night and tripped. Just like that, in the middle of a ballet, in front of thousands of spectators at the Metropolitan Opera House, Post found herself in a dancer’s lowest circle of hell. She’d torn the anterior cruciate ligament in her knee. Another dancer had to drag her offstage. Fast-forward a couple of years, and Post is sitting in a movie theater, watching the Jennifer Lawrence thriller “Red Sparrow.” She was there mainly to see her best friend, ABT principal Isabella Boylston, who is Lawrence’s dance double in the movie. Lawrence starts out a Bolshoi ballerina and ends up a Russian spy/sex worker — all because of a grisly injur...

The Secret to Productive Alone Time in the Studio

BY ALICE BLUMENFELD  via www.dancemagazine.com Whether you’re a dancer, a choreographer, or both, having time alone in the studio allows artists to grow in ways that class or rehearsal simply doesn’t. Yet without other people around to tell you what to do or keep you accountable, it’s easy to get stuck staring at yourself in the mirror, wondering where to begin. Here’s how to make the most of your studio time and avoid staring aimlessly back at your reflection: 1. Set specific goals Why are you in the studio? To work on a particular aspect of your technique? To set new choreography? To work on steps you recently learned? Make sure you know why you’re there, otherwise self-motivating can be nearly impossible. 2. Take time to warm up Especially if you’ve p...

Is your body language holding back your career?

BY SARAH WROTH via www.dancemagazine.com Dancers are physical communicators. It is both our profession and our passion. But what happens when the music stops and there is a break in rehearsals? Our communication doesn’t end when the choreography is completed. The truth is, the way you act at rest can make or break your career. Ballet masters, choreographers and artistic directors see meaning in all forms of body language, not just those that happen while the music is playing. Maintain Eye Contact Dancers need to demonstrate active listening skills. Even when you’re not dancing, choreographers take note of who’s watching what is being demonstrated. If your back is turned, there is an assumption that your ears are not open. Julie Kent, artistic director of The Washington Ba...

A Day in the Life of a ‘Lion King’ Dancer

BY KRISTIN SCHWAB via www.dancemagazine.com As an ensemble dancer in The Lion King, India Bolds, age 32, plays nine characters in every show, eight times a week. That’s a lot of entrances and exits, costume changes and choreography to remember. But after five years of dancing in the production, she has the show down pat. Dance Magazine followed her through a performance day to see what it takes to be in Broadway’s third-longest-running production. Bolds and her fiancé at home. Photo by Jim Lafferty 9 am: Dancing on Broadway means late nights in the theater, so Bolds sleeps in. She and her fiancé will wake up, make some tea and go over their days. “Mornings are the only time Dale and I have together, especially on a two-show day like today,” says Bolds. “I got ...

Backstage With Tommy Tune

BY STEPHENIE LAWTON via www.dancemagazine.com Tommy Tune is a man of many talents. The 10-time Tony Award–winning director, choreographer and star is famous for shows like Nine, My One and Only, The Will Roger’s Follies and The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas. Tune is in a special class of gifted director/choreographers that includes George Balanchine, Jerome Robbins and Michael Bennett—yet he also danced and starred in his musicals. Today, he is touring the country with his nightclub act Tommy Tune Tonight. At 79, he is still lithe, graceful and willowy, and looks right at home onstage. So what’s it like to be backstage with the legend? Tune recently invited Dance Magazine behind the scenes for a rehearsal and performance in Los Angeles. Everyone Dresses Their Best For Tommy T...