Blog

Q&A with RSC head of voice Kate Godfrey

BY TIM BANO via www.thestage.co.uk With a remit covering vocal techniques, teaching dialects and interpreting text, Kate Godfrey coaches the Royal Shakespeare Company’s actors to make the most challenging lines comprehensible on stage. She tells Tim Bano why striving for clarity rather than sounding posh is the key to making yourself understood A few years into his career as a lawyer, the ancient Roman orator Cicero, the man who practically invented many of the techniques of modern rhetoric, decided he needed a voice coach. There’s an extraordinary continuity that two millennia later, ahead of the West End opening of Imperium, the Royal Shakespeare Company’s adaptation of Robert Harris’ Cicero trilogy, Kate Godfrey is working with the cast on some of the same techniques Apollonius Molon us...

OPINION: Will there ever be a Tony Award for Stage Management?

BY MATTHEW STERN via www.stagemanagers.org The 2017-18 Broadway season is officially in the rearview mirror and culminated in the Tony Awards a few weeks ago. Since then I’ve been reflecting on the season and about stage managers.  Because stage management is what I think about. And I wondered why there isn’t a Tony Award for the stage manager? Our industry honors so many in our industry, but on its special nationally televised night. There is no stage management acknowledgement. In fact, there is no annual stage management award at any of the big ceremonies: Drama Desks, Obies, Outer Circle Critics, Lortels, etc… It would be great to be recognized, of course; but we stage managers don’t make the cut. Why? Here are my six reasons why stage managers don’t get awards #1. Awards focus on what...

8 New Theatre Books You Need to Read This Summer

BY LOGAN CULWELL-BLOCK via www.playbill.com Looking for a theatrical summer title? We’ve got you covered with these theatre books coming out this summer. And Then We Danced: A Voyage Into the Groove, by Henry Alford When celebrated comic writer Henry Alford was asked to write about his experience at a Zumba class for The New York Times, he didn’t realize that it would be the beginning of a new obsession: dance. Now Alford has written about his “voyage” into the world of dance, from Bob Fosse to George Balanchine, Twyla Tharp, and Arthur Murray. With new insight and Alford’s trademark humor, Alford offers this cultural history to show how dance so expertly expresses the human experience. Out now from Simon & Schuster   Peggy to Her Playwrights: The Letters of Margaret Ramsay, by Co...

Theatre Concierge

Name Pj Phillips Date 06/25/2018 Venue Center Theatre Group Email ctgjobs@ctgla.org Job Discription POSITION TITLE: Theatre Concierge REPORTS TO: House Manager DIRECT REPORTS: None WORK SCHEDULE: Part-Time, typically nights & weekends STATUS: Non-Exempt, Hourly ABOUT THE COMPANY: Center Theatre Group is one of the nation’s most influential and ambitious nonprofit theatre companies, producing and presenting a wide variety of plays and musicals each year in our three Los Angeles venues: the Ahmanson Theatre, the Mark Taper Forum and the Kirk Douglas Theatre. A beacon of creativity and a driving force in the creation, development and production of new work, Center Theatre Group has been the birthplace of plays that have been honored with Tony Awards, Ovation Awards, L.A. Drama Critic Circ...

Tom Hanks Ad-libs His Way Through an Audience Emergency

via www.theatremania.com Hanks wows the crowd with his improv skills as an audience member takes ill. Tom Hanks is currently starring as Falstaff in Daniel Sullivan’s production of Shakespeare’s Henry IV in Los Angeles. During a recent performance as the Fat Knight, the multi-award-winning actor proved that he’s as good at improv as he is at everything else. When an audience member took ill, Hanks stormed the stage — in character — to calm the crowd down and get the show back on track. View Original Article

2018 Tony Award Winners

BY ADAM HETRICK via www.playbill.com The intimate chamber musical The Band’s Visit, which transferred to Broadway last fall following a sold-out world-premiere run at the Atlantic Theater Company Off-Broadway, was the biggest winner at the 72nd Annual Tony Awards, which were presented June 10 at Radio City Music Hall. Tony Shalhoub and Katrina Lenk Matthew Murphy Tony voters responded to composer David Yazbek and playwright Itamar Moses’ adaptation of the 2007 film by Eran Kolirin about an Egyptian police band stranded in a remote village in the Israeli desert, awarding it ten Tony Awards in total, including Best Musical. The Band’s Visit earned Tony Awards for Best Original Score, Best Book, Best Direction (David Cromer), Best Orchestrations (Jamshied Sharifi), Best Sound Design (Kai Hara...

What it takes to put on the Tony Awards

BY CAITLIN HUSTON via www.broadway.news After more than 15 years producing the Tony Awards, Ricky Kirshner and Glenn Weiss have learned the tips and tricks of putting on the show at Radio City Music Hall. One trick: adding a false proscenium to reduce the size of the 100-foot-wide stage, so that the musical numbers do not look dwarfed by their surroundings. With that issue behind them, Kirshner and Weiss are concentrated on overseeing more than 700 people inside the house, from stagehands to production staff and cast members, in addition to nailing down the running order and making sure hosts Sara Bareilles and Josh Groban have moments to shine. Weiss, who is also directing the Tony Awards show, and Kirshner have been preparing for the awards show all season, as they both try to see every ...

8 Audition Book Myths

BY AMIE MARIE STEWART via www.backstage.com As a voice teacher in New York City, I work with many newly arrived actors packing tons of talent, great training, and a whole lot of misconceptions about their audition books. I recently conducted interviews with industry experts, from Broadway actors to casting directors, and what I learned might surprise some new to the city…even some who aren’t. Here are eight of the most common audition book myths out there. 1. A typical audition book has around 20 songs.  The experts agreed that the best audition books have a total of 6-9 songs, max. “At some level, that’s the number of songs a performer could have ready at a moment’s notice,” says casting director Michael Cassara. A huge book is a red flag that the actor won’t be prepared on songs th...

5th Ave Theatre to Star Deaf Actor as Lead in Hunchback of Notre Dame

Deaf Actor to Play Quasimodo in Hunchback of Notre Dame Joshua Castille, like Quasimodo in Victor Hugo’s “The Hunchback of Notre Dame”, is a deaf actor. Yet he has the skills of any hard-working actor. With hearing aids, he has been able to perform in many shows successfully, but this one will be different; Castille will perform without his hearing aids, making him go completely without hearing. Josh is set to do the entire song in American Sign Language (ASL), while actor E.J. Cardona will sing the lyrics. “John came in and gave the most remarkable audition I’d ever seen”, “I could see how when an actor signs, it’s so moving for the audience, and the actor can really get inside of the character.”, said Glenn Casale, Veteran Director. C...

#TBT: May 3rd – Birthday of Lyricist Betty Comden

Throwback Thursday: May 3, 1917,  Broadway & Hollywood lyricist and librettist Betty Comden is born. “A risk was taken with ‘On the Town’, and look what happened: Betty and Adolph burst onto the scene. A shout-out to Comden & Green!” (Title of Show). Lyricists and librettist Betty Comden, of t Comden & Green, was born May 3, 1917. She and Adolph Green are known for several works, such as On the Town (1944), Singin’ in the Rain (1952), and Bells are Ringing (1956). Together, this duo’s musical comedy talents became theatrical classics that are still performed and beloved today. Born in Brooklyn, NY, Comden had always considered herself a performer, and she was first seen on the stage at the Brooklyn Ethical Culture School (jwa.org). Comden went on to major in drama at New York U...

An MRI Reveals How the Vocal Tract Changes Singing Four Different Ways

BY LORI DORN via www.laughingsquid.com Using an MRI machine at the NYU Langone Voice Center, the very talented vocalist and teacher Tyley Rossbrilliantly demonstrated the changing physicality of his vocal tract as he sang the classic Puccini aria “Nessun Dorma” in four different ways; a light and heady mix, “forward facing Broadway”, “back and down Opera” and in a rock style. As seen through the MRI, each vocal style had its own set physical features. What you’re looking at here are comparative images of the same vowel being sung at the same moment in each vocal style. …take a moment to see for yourself how the anatomical features of the vocal tract that we can see here align differently in each style. How does the tongue position differently? How about the view on the mouth opening? How a...

An Actor’s Guide to Life After Graduation

BY CORY HUNDT via www.backstage.com After years of long rehearsals, memorizing too many lines to count, studying the likes of Stanislavsky, Hagen, and Shakespeare (to name a few), creating lifelong friendships and collaboration partners, and perhaps even acting in or writing a thesis, you’re about to graduate with an acting degree. Congratulations! But now what? Before you freak about the prospect of being thrust out into the “real world” without a helping hand, here’s a step-by-step guide to inform the way you navigate this exciting but also overwhelming time in your career. 1 Year Before Graduation One year before you’re set to graduate, be sure that you’re on track with all of the correct classes and credits you need to finish on time. If you don’t already have built-in meetings with yo...

  • 1
  • 2
  • 8